Your Cart

Current Issue

No.13

Sometimes, what sticks with you most happens after the last putt drops. No. 13 basks in what the game gives us, on and off the course. A mystic surfer with lessons on life and playing Riviera. A walker bag that brought a global community together. An intimate portrait of Herbert Warren Wind, the legendary writer who coined Amen Corner and whose volumes still resonate. Beginners becoming diehards on transformed vacant lots. A happy argument over the best par 3s in Australia. Night golf and even more found inside.

Past Issues

The Golfer’s Journal No.12

No.12

Like a par save from the bushes, No. 12 defiantly makes its own way. Some names will be familiar, like Seve Ballesteros marauding onto the U.S. golf scene, Coore & Crenshaw turning trashed land into Trinity Forest and Fowler & Wolff returning to Oklahoma State. But some, like rebel architect Desmond Muirhead, and Wawashkamo, the island course stuck in time, must be read to be believed. It’s enough to make one long for a comfortable pint at an iconic St. Andrews watering hole. Scroll to get that too.

The Golfer’s Journal No.11

No.11

Jack driving a Pontiac. Hogan revving a Toro. Tiger’s iconic “Hello World” spot. No. 11 celebrates the art, power and influence of golf’s pitchmen and women in our first-ever special section. It includes so many essays and old-school stunners we had to add eight bonus pages. Then it’s on to a range sesh with 97-year-old legend Jack Burke, treks to Royal St. George’s, Silvies Valley Ranch, and Pebble Beach, and even a daring mission to a sand course in Libya. Scroll for No. 11’s full script.

No. 10

A fever dream turned real at Cypress Point. From Pine Valley to a four-hole round, No. 10 toasts the fearless insurgents who dare to push our game’s boundaries. These visionaries have always been with us, seen in rare looks at the reversible course at St. Andrews and the revolutionary templates of National Golf Links of America. Visits to Ohoopee, the club that eliminated par, and Brough Creek National, the course shaped by bare hands, show that the spirit still burns. May the dreams never die. More immortalized below.

No. 9

On the cover: An explosion of hope. TGJ steadfastly believes in golf’s ability to carry us to a higher place and that beauty can be found on the course, even in failure. No.9 features an oil painter who became a superintendent, a frustrated player turned world-famous photographer and a foul-mouthed preacher who first envisioned Sweetens Cove. It highlights the game’s remarkable way it faces tragedies like the shattering loss of a college teammate and the climate crisis’s effect on a Scottish gem. Ultimately, it stirs us with words and images from Tom Coyne’s round with poet laureate Billy Collins, Jim Dodson’s gorgeous paean to the solo round and the great John Updike’s golfing words to live by. Further inspiration continues below.

No. 8

On the cover: A moment to cherish at North Berwick. TGJ No. 8 is a collection of unforgettable times on the course, from a champagne-soaked tee shot at Yale to the Solheim crowd roaring for Danielle Kang to a caddie’s son finally understanding his father. Timeless heroes appear throughout, including photographer Michael Faye’s series of trailblazers like Charlie Sifford and Renee Powell, the man who sculpted Payne Stewart and Arnold Palmer, and a band of road-trippers riding after Ben Hogan’s ghost. Take some more time and enjoy the moments below.

No. 7

On the cover: A neon shout-out to those who paved the way. TGJ No. 7 tips its cap to the brilliance of golf’s past shaping its present. Cover photographer Leonard Kamsler’s pioneering work alongside death-defying drone shots. Carne’s legendary original 18 inspiring its newer nine. An unlikely poet and a master watercolorist meet the social media set. Shared inspiration between a Canadian man with his chainsaw and another with a bulldozer at Bandon. The lines are myriad, and they continue below.

No. 6

On the cover: A moment of reflection as Mount Fuji peers down on Japan’s Taiheiyo Gotemba Country Club. No matter where it’s played, golf’s incredible connective tissue is revealed throughout No. 6. Whether it’s MacKenzie gems in Northern California and Melbourne or new legends at The Loop and Kiawah, the links are clear. Famous comedians and veteran club-fitters know, as do players in cities as different as Boston and New Orleans: Golf is always the tie that binds. Find your connections below.

No. 5

On the cover: Ravi making his own course in Mumbai. No. 5 highlights diehards like Ravi and his friends, celebrating the places found and the lessons learned by those willing to make the effort and take the chance. From the world’s largest private golf library in Cleveland to Gil Hanse’s dream coming true on Pinehurst No. 4 to Tom Coyne’s tour of Scottish links with a dedicated duffer, No. 5 goes the distance. Explore digital golf course architecture wizardry, the controversy it inspires and why Stanford’s women’s team wins by going old-school. Adventure awaits below.

No. 4

On the cover: No crowds, no phones, no cart paths. Just a golfer and his most faithful companion. No. 4 is a paean to the beauty and breadth of the game. At Machrihanish Dunes in Scotland, Tom Coyne finds joy in a modern course built with the Old Tom’s tools. In Harlem, artist Charles McGill valiantly showed how people of all colors can make golf a lifelong pursuit. There is heartbreak and redemption on a Nashville muni, a brash gamble in Las Vegas and three titans breaking the rules at Streamsong. Old stories of Arnold Palmer’s sensational Augusta caddie share a golfing soul with uber-talented young women making new marks on the game. And David Owen’s essay on club restaurants is a riot, but the point is clear: There is nothing better than golf.

No. 3

One of the game’s most imitated illustrations. Ben Hogan has a grip on this issue, from the precision of South Korean golf to the power of Alister MacKenzie’s genius at Pasatiempo. Secrets, not unlike the one Hogan said he found in the dirt, abound in No. 3, including Tom Coyne’s unlikely discovery at Shiskine, Caleb Hannan’s revealing ride with some golf’s greatest hustlers and the new light we shine on the artist who drew Hogan’s hands. The Hawk doesn’t have the same hold on Will Leitch, as he discusses his troubles with golf in a challenging essay. But even doubters will see the beauty in a grass-roots success in Chicago, a rising young photographer at the PGA Tour, and a trip through the stunning Canadian wilds with architect Riley Johns.

No. 2

On the cover: Payne Stewart, ignoring the roar at Pebble Beach, California, in 1991. Payne is watching over an issue full of style, substance, and soul that runs from Tom Coyne’s “Sacred Sand” to Caleb Hannan’s exploration of the outer limits of “pure golf” at the Bally Bandon Sheep Ranch. Excursions to an unlikely golf Mecca in Tennessee, a family-run hickory factory in Louisville, Kentucky, Gary Player’s stud ranch in South Africa, and a course called Rye for the annual Oxford vs. Cambridge old boys tournament make this a truly global affair. Representations of the game throughout range from Ballesteros, S. to Skywalker, L., and from oil on canvas to beyond the visible spectrum.

Subscribe

Already a subscriber? Sign in